Gaudeamus Igitur

The Traditional University Students Hymn 

  

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The Great Hall, University of Sydney circa 1940


"Gaudeamus" has been the traditional University student's song for two hundred years, and the tune is still played and sung along to, at many University graduation ceremonies around the world today. Historically, it has also been the University student's traditional drinking song, and is regarded as the original embodiment of the free and easy student life. A latin manuscript dated 1267 contains the words to verses two and three of the modern Gaudeamus (as part of a poem entitled "Scribere Proposui"); however, it did not contain the words 'Gaudeamus Igitur' or any of the modern first verse, and was set to music which bears no resemblance to the well-known modern melody, which is presumed to have been written by Johannes Christian Grünthaus in 1717 and rewritten by Christian Nilh Kindleben in 1781. Johannes Brahms ( 1833 - 1897 ) made use of Gaudeamus Igitur in his 'Academic Festival' ouverture opus 80. In the continuing spirit of student fraternity, Lodge University of Sydney has traditionally sung the first two verses of this song in honour of its visitors since its formation in 1924. We encourage all visitors to sing along!

Gaudeamus igitur, Let us therefore rejoice,

Iuvenes dum sumus while we are young.

Post Iucundam iuventutem After our youth,

Post molestam senectutem After a troublesome old age,

Nos habebit humus The earth will hold us.

Nos habebit humus The earth will hold us.


Ubi sunt qui ante nos, Where are they now,

In mundo fuere? that preceded us in this world?

Vadite ad superos You may search the heavens

Transite in inferos You may traverse the underworld

Ubi am fuere If you wish to find them.

Ubi am fuere If you wish to find them.


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